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Introducing the PRINCE2 Principles

Project Health Check

PRINCE2 is a popular UK Project Management methodology, that continues to gain traction in other locations around the world. Now managed by Axelos, it is part of a comprehensive and integrated best practice suite along side other methodologies such as Management of Risk (M_o_R) and Managing Successful Programmes (MSP). Then there is the PRINCE2 "Processes", equivalent to the PMBOK "Process Groups" - essentially the flow of phases throughout the Project Life cycle.

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PRINCE2: The Project Management Method Explained

Girl's Guide to PM

What is PRINCE2? PRINCE2 is a project management method. It’s structured, and experience-based, created from the lived experience of thousands of project managers and successful projects. PRINCE2 stands for Projects IN a Controlled Environment (Version 2).

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Risk Management Resources

Herding Cats

Risk Management is essential for development and production programs. Information about key project cost, (technical) performance, and schedule attributes is often uncertain or unknown until late in the program. Risk issues that can be identified early in the program, which will potentially impact the program later, termed Known Unknowns and can be alleviated with good risk management. Effective Risk Management 2 nd Edition , Edmund Conrow, AIAA, 2003. 2, 2017.

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A Compendium of Risk Management Resources

Herding Cats

This blog page is dedicated to the resources used to manage the risk encountered on software-intensive systems using traditional and agile development methods. Let's start with a critical understanding of the purpose of managing risk on software development projects. Risk Management is essential for development and production programs. Effective Risk Management 2nd Edition, Edmund Conrow, AIAA, 2003. Risk a Feelings,” George F. Hammonds, Risk Analysis 14.5

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